WHIPLASH … More Than Just Neck Pain



Whiplash more than just neck pain

Whiplash Type Injuries And The Benefits Of Chiropractic Care

Have you been in a motor vehicle accident in Manitoba?

Whiplash

Chiropractic care is fully covered for individuals injured in a motor vehicle accident. If you have been injured in a motor vehicle accident and would like to consult a chiropractor, you can contact us at 204-985-6750. Early evaluation and treatment of the injured areas can lead to quicker recovery. You can report a claim by phoning the MPI Bodily Injury Claim Centre at 204-985-7000 to receive a Bodily Injury Claim Number. Inform your MPI service representative that you will be seeing your chiropractor for care. If you would like to request an appointment today, please click here.

The definition of whiplash encompasses many different types of injuries to the neck and upper back. Most whiplash injuries occur as a result of motor vehicle accidents. The most common type of whiplash happens when a car is rear-ended.

Chiropractors and Whiplash

Most people naturally understand the risks and injuries that stem from accidents at high speeds. Few people, however, understand the large majority of whiplash injuries from car accidents occur from low-speed collisions. Research confirms that injuries sustained in automobile accidents with speeds as low as 5.97 mph or 9.61 km/h can create spinal injuries with potential long-term or even permanent damage.

Whiplash injuries most commonly damage three different spinal tissues: joints, ligaments, and muscles. Spinal joints allow for movement and include the connective surfaces between two vertebrae. Ligaments attach from bone to bone and exist to support and hold bones in their correct position. Muscles surround the bones and ligaments to provide support and all voluntary movement in the joint. Whiplash injuries can potentially damage all three types of tissue.

Whiplash neck

Muscles and ligaments forcibly stretch beyond their physiological range during a whiplash injury. Untreated injuries and tears eventually heal and form permanent scar tissue. Muscle and ligament injuries negatively impact spinal joints causing the joints to lose their full range of motion. A lack of movement by joints and muscles directly contributes to long-term health problems. Spinal joints require an appropriate amount of movement to maintain normal function. The degenerative process initiates in as soon as a few days or weeks after the restrictions in motion begin. Prolonged reduction in movement creates an environment where decay and degeneration continually damage the joint.

Chiropractic adjustments restore healthy joint motion to the restricted vertebrae. Adjustments slow down or stop the degenerative process by improving nerve function to the muscles and restricted joints. Corrective Chiropractic care impacts the onset of injury-related degeneration. Research proves that auto accidents occurring at speeds of less than 10 Km/h can generate enough force to trigger a degenerative cascade of injuries to the movable joints found within the body. The same evidence demonstrates how injuries occur from falls, contact sports, and other impact related traumas.

Long-term spinal injuries affect people of all ages and gender. A thorough spinal evaluation assesses the position and movement capabilities in each spinal vertebra. Reversing or preventing spinal dysfunction means the difference between optimal health and the potential for a lifetime of stiffness, soreness, and joint degeneration. Whiplash injuries create interference between the brain and body. Chiropractors call this interference a vertebral subluxation. Subluxations influence virtually every aspect of human health and performance due to damaging irritation created in the nervous system. Chiropractic adjustments combined with home exercises, and spinal movement address multiple areas that help restore motion and a reduced risk of chronic spinal degeneration.

We recommend you consult your chiropractor today.


Reference: Personal Injury Law Journal, September 2006, “Putting the 5 MPH Injury Threshold to the Test”, Brian Henderson